Sunday, 20 February 2011

Worth Matravers and Winspit

On such a nice Sunday afternoon what is better than a nice walk from the little village of Worth Watravers down to Winspit. I have been on two very busy night shifts so am very sleep deprived but a bit of fresh sea air is a great reviver! We left the village and walked down through the field, hills on either side of us lined with the old strip lytchetts on the fields, made many years ago. We got to the quarry which is here right by the sea, you can go in the caves and wander about in them They are a favourite place for bats to hang out.
The views from here are stunning, the picture above is looking east, back towards Swanage.

In 1786 a ship called the Halsewell foundered on the rocks between Winspit and Seacombe and was smashed to pieces, 168 people drowned.There are said to be relics of the ship in many Purbeck homes and some in the Dorset Museum in Dorchester, there is also a mirror from the Haslewell in the Church at Worth Matravers. The ship was bound for Bengal. There were a few survivors but the Captain, his daughters and two neices died, he had refused to leave his ship knowing that his family could not be saved. The dead were buried near Seacombe. After a little time sea watching we headed back up to the village, a gentle climb of a mile and a quarter.....which is alot when you are massively sleep deprived!

The cottages in the village are quaint and old but most of the village is owned by 2nd home owners and has lost it's heart and soul. I know this as I used to stay here regularly when I stayed with a local farming family long before I was married and came to know the village well. This was 35 years ago and even they have gone now, leaving it to the 2nd home brigade.

In the graveyard is the grave of Benjamen Jesty and his wife, Elizabeth. In 1774 he gave the first injection of cow pox to his very trusting wife and probably unknowing sons, they survived and he had created an innoculation which saved lives worldwide.
Just opposite the church gate is this little building in someone's garden, and I would love to see inside it! The chimney is intriquing, maybe it's a potters shed and the chimney is a kiln chimney, but I like to think it's a snug with a little log fire called 'The Hut" as it says on the door!
So ended a very pleasant Sunday afternoon.






7 comments:

Eileen said...

Another lovely Sunday afternoon walk...you are so lucky. The caves look fascinating...I love caves and visit them whereever I travel-I must remember them if I ever get to England.

Bovey Belle said...

My favourite walk of all time, especially on a hot summers' day with clouds of butterflies in the sheltered quarries by Winspit. Perhaps they are gone now though - I am speaking of many years ago . . .

I am James. said...

Found your blog while having a surf, very good, lovely photos, looks like you had a wonderful walk, I hope it cleared out the cobwebs. Geogerous village, but a real shame about the 2nd homers ruining it, I know its controversial but there really should be some heavy taxing of selfish people that buy up houses thus pushing prices beyond the locals purse.

Happyone :-) said...

I would have loved to take that walk with you. :-)
Lots of history there too as well as so much beauty.

The Wessex Reiver said...

There's an article about the Haswell in this months Dorset Life, what a coincidence. So go on did you go into the Square and Compass for a lite bite? (mind you they only do cheese and onion pasties, but what a pub)

Kath said...

How lovely, so British :-D

Dartford Warbler said...

I love this walk! One of our family favourites.
We last went two summers ago and there were still butterfies.